Behind the Scenes: Sauvignon Blanc


After nearly a month of fermentation, our Two Old Dogs Sauvignon Blanc is completely dry (meaning that we have fermented out all of the natural sugar in the sweet ripe grapes picked a month ago, and there is no residual sugar in the wine)! At this point in the process, we thought it would be fun to revisit how we got here with our Sauvignon Blanc this year. Enjoy the behind the scenes process!

Gorgeous, juicy berries — all ready to become WINE!

Gorgeous, juicy berries — all ready to become WINE!

Raking the fruit into the sorting machine.

Raking the fruit into the sorting machine.

Winemaker Mike Trujillo, monitoring the new Pellenc sorting machine.

Winemaker Mike Trujillo, monitoring the new Pellenc sorting machine.

After every last grape has been plucked off! The stems now go into a grinder to become compost for future vintages.

After every last grape has been plucked off! The stems now go into a grinder to become compost for future vintages.

Jennifer Lamb with winemaker Mike Trujillo, discussing their next moves for this year's fruit.

Jennifer Lamb with winemaker Mike Trujillo, discussing their next moves for this year's fruit.

The Pellanc sorting all the green (immature) berries from the stemmer/crusher so that none of them end up in the fermenter! Mechanically is much more precise than manually attempting to sort the tiny berries!

The Pellanc sorting all the green (immature) berries from the stemmer/crusher so that none of them end up in the fermenter! Mechanically is much more precise than manually attempting to sort the tiny berries!

Feels like Chem lab, eh? The purpose of the dry ice addition is to delay the alcoholic fermentation by lowering the temperature where yeast cannot ferment. This allows certain chemical compounds to be extracted from the grape skins before alcohol is present. The release of carbon dioxide from the dry ice also keeps the juice from oxidizing and protects it from bacteria.

Feels like Chem lab, eh? The purpose of the dry ice addition is to delay the alcoholic fermentation by lowering the temperature where yeast cannot ferment. This allows certain chemical compounds to be extracted from the grape skins before alcohol is present. The release of carbon dioxide from the dry ice also keeps the juice from oxidizing and protects it from bacteria.

A stream of free-run Sauvignon Blanc juice, just pressed, flowing into dry ice.

A stream of free-run Sauvignon Blanc juice, just pressed, flowing into dry ice.

Almost there!

Almost there!

This year, we'll be using a few neutral french oak barrels for further aging. Be sure to follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook for year-round updates and more behind-the-scenes fun!
 

All photos by Emma K. Morris

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